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City Hall and all other City facilities are closed to the public as a precaution against the spread of COVID-19. The closures will be effective after 5 p.m. Thursday, March 19, and will continue through May 15, 2020. City staff will continue to report to their offices and serve the public. Residents are encouraged to conduct City business online or by contacting individual City departments directly. Residents who are unsure how to conduct their City business may contact the City’s customer service hotline from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at 515.239.5670.

Battery Disposal

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Alkaline and carbon-zinc batteries (non-rechargeable batteries used in toys, radios, flashlights, and other household products) can still safely be placed in the trash.

Mercuric-oxide batteries (non-rechargeable batteries used in hearing aids) can be turned in to the manufacturer or retailer, or drop it off at Resource Recovery at no charge.

Lithium-ion batteries should be dropped off at Resource Recovery at no charge. Lithium-ion batteries are incredibly popular these days. You can find them in laptops, cell phones and iPods. They're so common because, pound for pound, they're some of the most energetic rechargeable batteries available.

Lithium-ion batteries have also been in the news lately. That’s because these batteries have the ability to burst into flames occasionally. It's not very common -- just two or three battery packs per million have a problem -- but when it happens, it's extreme. If you dispose of them in your garbage, it will likely start a fire once it breaks open in our shredder-- and that's scary!

Nickel-cadmium (NiCad) batteries (rechargeable batteries used in kitchen appliances, rechargeable power tools and other household products) can be turned in to the manufacturer or retailer, or drop it off at Resource Recovery at no charge.

Small lead-acid batteries (rechargeable batteries used in camcorders, laptop computers, cell phones, and other household products) can be turned in to the manufacturer or retailer, or drop it off at Resource Recovery at no charge.

Lead-acid batteries (from your car, boat, motorcycle, etc.) can be dropped off at Resource Recovery at no charge.

Any other batteries -- drop off at Resource Recovery at no charge.

                                                            Energizer AA battery9-volt batteryWatch battery